Juan Arabia | Biography

Juan Arabia (Buenos Aires, Argentina,1983) is a poet, translator, and literary critic. In addition to publishing five books of poetry, he has written extensively on John Fante and the Beat Generation. He has translated Arthur Rimbaud, Ezra Pound (Exultations, Lustra, Cathay), and a book-length anthology of the Beat poets[1]. His books of poetry have been published throughout Latin America, Europe, and China: El Enemigo de los Thirties (2015), L´Océan Avare (2018), Desalojo de la naturaleza (2018), and Hacia Carcassonne (2020), among others. He graduated from the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires and holds a master’s degree in American literature from the University of Edinburgh. He is the founder and director of Buenos Aires Poetry[2].

Poet Juan Arabia.webp

Biography

In addition to publishing five books of poetry, he has written extensively on John Fante and the Beat Generation[3]. He has translated Arthur Rimbaud, Ezra Pound, and a book-length anthology of the Beat poets. His books of poetry have been published throughout Latin America, Europe, and China: El Enemigo de los Thirties (2015), L´Océan Avare (2018), Desalojo de la naturaleza (2018), and Hacia Carcassonne (2020), among others. He graduated from the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires and holds a master’s degree in American literature from the University of Edinburgh. He is the founder and director of Buenos Aires Poetry[4].

Some critics have called Arabia an neo-romantic, anti-bourgeois poet: “But if Juan Arabia is a neo-romantic, anti-bourgeois poet, as we have said, he lacks any blasphemous or degrading tone toward that society that devotes itself tragically to depriving words of all their foundations, to submitting them to the imperatives of action or the tyranny of the universal lie. Why doesn’t he make use, as we would expect, of this Decadent resource? Because, before dissolving his language in irrationality, the poet knows he must maintain, at least at first, the tranquility of his constancy; he wants to be heard, he wants to re-establish poetry’s place as the ancient governess of humanity. So, instead of throwing around errant words or trying his luck down forgotten paths, the Argentine poet goes on a pilgrimage to the sources of language, prior to its neutralization as a vague social function. His lyrical tone transforms calmness into a dart launched against the degradation of life. The poet has read much and read well: Coleridge, Rimbaud, Verlaine, the Bible, the Beats, and, particularly, Ezra Pound and Dylan Thomas. By reading well, I refer to taking the necessary time, to admiring, to adhering to foreign creeds, but also to letting things pass. The economy of his verse, his technical rigor, speak to a well-used poetics, although the character of his message suggests that of a spoken voice: that of a prophet who comes from far away to complete his mission, as is revealed in the preamble of El enemigo de los Thirties, his first battle cry in the open field, widely unfavorable, where “other horrible workers” have already fallen”[5]

Patricio Ferrari wrote about desalojo de la naturaleza: “Juan Arabia’s ‘Juicio’ reminds us of this, of a poem born from the shelves of poetry: the sonnet, a fourteen-line construct with a distinctive volta on the 9th line (We set afar, among friends —). And, to some extent, it carries the lineage of other poems: Baudelaire’s ‘Le Voyage’, Pound’s opening of The Cantos, Pessoa’s ‘Viajar! Perder paizes!’ [To travel! Leave countries behind!], to mention but a few.  In this sense ‘Juicio’ is a translation—of a motif in the world of letters harkening back through the centuries, namely the experience of poetry as departure, as wandering and wonderment, as quest. And, naturally, it isn’t one”.

Poetry

  • Juan ARABIA, El Enemigo de los Thirties, Buenos Aires Poetry, Buenos Aires, 2015.
  • Juan ARABIA, Il nemico dei Thirties, Samuele Editore, Fanna (Italia,) 2017.
  • Juan ARABIA, desalojo de la naturaleza, Buenos Aires Poetry, Buenos Aires, 2018.
  • Juan ARABIA, L´Océan Avare (traduit par Jean Portante), Al Manar Editions, Neuilly (France), 2018[6].
  • Juan ARABIA, literatura de límites, Buenos Aires Poetry, Buenos Aires, 2018.
  • Juan ARABIA, Shanghai Minsheng Art Museum, ed. (Chapbook). 诗歌来到美术馆 NO.61 | 安·阿拉维亚诗歌朗读交流会. 翻译:Allinson Han. Shanghái, China, 2019[7]
  • Juan ARABIA, The Bund, Buenos Aires Poetry. translated by Gwendolyn Osterwald, 2020[8]
  • Juan ARABIA, Hacia Carcassonne, Pre-Textos, Valencia, 2021.

References

  1.  https://allenginsberg.org/2017/08/fridays-weekly-round-327/
  2.  https://www.emptymirrorbooks.com/literature/interview-with-argentina-poet-juan-arabia
  3.  “Friday’s Weekly Round-Up – 327”. August 4, 2017.
  4.  “Confronting the Institution of Language: Juan Arabia on Poetry and the Pandemic”Words Without Borders.
  5.  “”Against the Eviction of the Poet: An Introduction to the Poetry of Juan Arabia” by Rodrigo Arriagada Zubieta”Latin American Literature Today. October 21, 2017.
  6.  “L’Océan est avare, Juan Arabia (par Marc Wetzel)”http://www.lacauselitteraire.fr.
  7.  http://www.minshengart.com/cn/category/activity-list/detail!shi-ge-lai-dao-mei-shu-guan-No-61
  8.  Apol, Graham (July 14, 2020). “The Bund by Juan Arabia – translated by Gwendolyn Osterwald”.
  9. Paraphrasis-Fiction And Poetry | Juicio by Juan Arabia | Patricio Ferrari.  La Piccioletta Barca.

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